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  #1  
Old 16-05-2007, 06:05 PM
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How Old were U when you started? Also what do you think is a good age to start practiscing parkour.
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  #2  
Old 16-05-2007, 07:35 PM
Ben Ben is offline
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I was 14 when i began, just coming up to 15. I'm 16 now.

I'd say 14 is probably the earliest age really, without really damaging your joints.
Even then you have to keep it small.
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Old 16-05-2007, 08:54 PM
Mitsuko-Kun Mitsuko-Kun is offline
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I was 16 when I started, 19 now. As I started at 16 I can't say for sure, but I agree with Ben, 14 is the earliest I would recommend.
I wish I started 2 years earlier
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Old 16-05-2007, 09:04 PM
colexus colexus is offline
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i had just turned 16, and am now 18

i wish i had started earlier

i think you can start at any age with the right guidance

i mean, seb teaches his kids some stuff and they are tiny, also look out for danny's little brother

obviously they wont be doing big cat passes or precisions or anything

but getting them out and jumping about, crawling, running climbing onto low things

all these things help develop your gross motor skills and prepare you for bigger things later in life
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Old 16-05-2007, 10:22 PM
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bloobirds bloobirds is offline
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it depends what you define as parkour my cousin is 12, he trains for parkour. Has done for two years.
He doesn't do any drops, nor many jumps.
he climbs.he runs. he crawls. he vaults. he balances.


[i was 15]
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  #6  
Old 17-05-2007, 05:19 PM
sniperpk sniperpk is offline
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well i was 13 when i first started.
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Old 18-05-2007, 12:01 PM
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15 i first saw it when i had just turned 13 wish i had started then......
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Old 18-05-2007, 08:20 PM
~TJ~ ~TJ~ is offline
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haha i started at ten
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Old 18-05-2007, 08:33 PM
Bernie Bernie is offline
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i was 11 when i started. i think that you can start at any age as long as you train properly and have a bit of guidance. I mean atm i haven't done any drops higher than my shoulders and i don't plan to.
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Old 18-05-2007, 09:58 PM
Teghead Teghead is offline
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I was 14. I'm not sure I agree about that being the youngest age you should start. Toby was 10 as he's said, and he trains very sensibly and is getting great results from his training at the moment. His strength in particular is coming a long way lately. Do you have any painful joints by the way TJ?

One way of thinking about it is that the training we do is only potentially damaging to our bodies, or as some people would say "unnatural", is because we have conditioned ourself away from this way of moving.

If we all ran about with no shoes on, climbed trees, balanced on things, crawled and jumped about all our childhood all day as children would have in earlier ages; our joints and muscles would be much stronger and able to take our training well, not to mention the way our minds would function, being far more confident and at home in our bodies and in all environments like trees. (I know tons of great practitionners that are really unco-ordinated and put off by trees; I also know people that are extremely at home in trees from playing in them a lot throughout their childhoods and up until now, namely Calum and Shane that I train with.)

Parkour/just moving in a primal way even, isn't just something you can be switched off to your whole life, and then think "wahey, this looks cool, i'll try that", because our bodies can't handle that. We need to take things so much slower in some respects.
It's easy to interperet that as if I'm saying we should stop pushing ourselves or let ourselves stay at plateaus - not at all.

I can't say what I'm thinking very well, but here's an example. Last year my training was very much based upon how much larger I can make movements. Sure, I conditioned a bit too, and started to get more creative with training, but it was essentially about doing certain "moves", and increasing the difficulty with size, and seeing how far I could push that. Eventually, I got to the stage where I couldn't get much further without hurting myself (I probably was already long-term) and I was also slightly bored of it. Over the last winter I had a re-think, and come back with a different approach.
Now, I'm not aiming to slow my progression so far, but to channel it somewhere else. I train 90% of the time barefoot now, I'm trying to correct my knees and ankles, so that my knees point slightly outwards rather than inwards and my feet point perfectly forwards. I'm also trying to correct my posture. I'm trying to make everything I do much faster, no matter what I'm wearing on my feet or body, and no matter the conditions. I'm not doing this to fit the criterea of "being efficient and a true traceur so I can save people" or something like that, I'm seeking speed because I find a great and enjoyable challenge in perfecting foot placement, hand placement, body positioning, making my body low to obstacles, and sprinting hard.
Maybe someday it will come in useful, but for now, I'm doing it because I enjoy it mostly, and I'm happy to admit that that's where I sit so far.

So, that went a bit off-topic, but what I'm trying to say is age shouldn't be relevant, but the way you approach training, it should be a gradual increase of the size and stresses of movements, and you should always try to stretch your limits of imagination and speed. Conditioning is vital of course.
But something that struck me the other day was that I've been training less than 3 years now. David Belle is in his 30s. I'm 16. David's over twice my age and still progressing, getting stronger, free from joint pains, enjoying Parkour. I have more than my current lifetime left to enjoy and hone my Parkour, far more. I can imagine, with correct training of course, us all training into our 40s, 50s, maybe beyond that to a certain extend, depending what you would define as training then.

Would you trade a quick rise to acclaim and praise within this community, and maybe some media-work for a lifetime of pain-free movement and functional physical and mental strength you can apply to everything in your life?
...You'd have to be mad, right?!
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