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Old 24-05-2007, 01:51 PM
WillWayland WillWayland is offline
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Muscles For Traceurs

Muscles or Size is seen as dirty words in the parkour community, many are under the impression that any sort of muscular size on a traceur will kill their performance. This misconception is born of ignorance, media bias (muscles are out right now in fashion) and long standing myth. I have encountered this myth during my time as a martial artist. As I gained weight I was lectured by various instructors that being bigger would hamper my fighting ability. Some even went as far as to say it would slow me down (giving long winded physics lectures). In martial arts this comes from marketing gimmicks, the student puts faith in the instructor that what they are learning will help them against bigger stronger opponents. If that bigger stronger opponent happens to be skilled you are going to experience alot of pain. Bruce Lee also propagated the myth by being quoted as saying “Sure he’s big but can he use that muscle?” oh man now the lord god Bruce has said it surely he cant be wrong. He never says if it is good or bad he merely poses a question. This is my personal experience of the “size is bad” myth. I keep seeing it popping up in parkour forums all over.

In general bigger muscle is going to be a stronger muscle (you don’t see many weak big guys and no i dont mean fat people). While that's not always the case, it is part of the equation. It has to be useable mass or relative mass. You don't want to send somebody into a weight class heavier if they're just going to be weaker and have bigger muscles. Parkour does'nt have weight classes so this is a non issue but still it's just going to be counterproductive. So we have "non-functional hypertrophy" — an increase in muscle mass that's not accompanied by a performance improvement. Now generally this rare but It can happen, shortlimbed lifters sometimes get this. But too achieve this a long devotion to eatting and imbalanced training must be maintained. Dont let this be you in the gym.


The main difference in hypertrophy beneficial to parkour and bodybuilding hypertrophy is where the general concern is and what parameters are going to be used. The traceur will be more concerned with the mass he has around the elbow joint, the lower part of the triceps. He'll be concerned with the mass he can develop around the knee, the lower quad area. Also the stabilizing mass, the rotator cuff region, back thickness – things that are going to help him with his parkour. We want these size gains to come with a performance improvement.

So the traceur needs to increase their performance with different muscle actions (concentric, isometric and eccentric) Lifting, lowering and static holds. They need to work on high-threshold motor units or fast twitch fibers, explosive movements. With parkour any sprinting, jumping, sudden stops or change of direction where the athlete must absorb and stop the weight of his body, requires a lot of eccentric and isometric strength. So we are looking to improve the force a contracting muscle produces and encouraging the elastic component of the muscle to improve force production.

Bashing on Bodyweight

The point is this... bodyweight exercise only programs will only take you so far, and then some form of resistance training must be applied to see further improvement. You cannot achieve the same loading especially for movements like deadlifting and squating using bodyweight even with the addition of weight. Im not aginst bodyweight movements. Its just using only bodyweight limits your potential development because the load ultimatly stays the same, breaking a cardinal rule of resistance training that load must increase to make improvements. Im yet to see the body weight equivalent of snatch/clean and jerk/deadlift or any real pulling movements involving the legs.


i so should have put this as the title of this article

You Are Not Special

Sorry you’re not, the traceur is a human being and adheres to the same laws of physiology and biomechanics everyone else does, despite impressive feats the traceur doesn’t build super special muscles that can do things normal people can’t. In my work you have to see the human body as an organic machine that needs to be primed for optimal performance sure programs are specialized for the individual needs but the body adheres to the same simple laws. One other thing that needs to be addressed is the concept of “sport specific” training for athletes. The bottom line is this… there is no such thing as sport specific training! I repeat…there is no such thing as sport specific training! Loading movements is an even worse idea because it effects mechanics (ie punching while holding weights) and are about as much use as a smith machine. All athletes have similar needs which include improving strength, speed, and flexibility as well as preventing injury. When you think about it, most sports have the same requirements. You hear it in your training from parkour coaches also, many folks specialize too much too soon and end up injuring themselves without building up a decent skill/conditioning base, the same is true here.


no not some futuristic death sword, a weighted golf club infact
The Method

With my athletes I primarily use the Russian Conjugate System of Periodization (thanks to Joe Defranco and the Westside guys), simply put, entails training various motor qualities simultaneously (max strength, explosive, strength endurance). Contrasted to the Western model of Linear Periodization defines a procedure wherein different motor qualities are periodically trained in sequence, over time. The deficiency associated with the linear style of periodization is that as one progresses from one motor skill to the next, the skill which was developed in the previous period suffers a detraining effect.

The Max/Dynamic Effort methodology was defined by Vladimir Zatsiorsky, a world renowned strength scientist and author, who determined that there are three distinct methods for developing maximal tension within skeletal muscle fibers. These are:

1. Lifting weights at high to maximal (max) percentages of one’s one rep max (i.e. Max Effort-strength speed).

2. Lifting sub-maximal weights explosively (i.e. Dynamic Effort-speed strength).

3. Lifting sub-maximal weights to concentric muscle failure (i.e. Repetition Method-strength endurance/lactic acid tolerance training-assistance/supplementary exercises).

The conjugate method takes all 3 of these and throws them together into daily programs.

So we take a Max effort lift (1) for each training session and shoot for 3-5 reps working up from a warm up. So progression may go on bench press for example 60 x 8, 100 x 6, 115 x 6, 125 x 6, 130 x 3-5. Max effort lifts can be anything. Sometimes I use pull-ups and other pulling variations, Farmer’s walks, tire flips or even regular, old-fashioned squats. Dynamics movements (2) revolve around taking a submaximal load and moving it as fast as possible, we have the supplementary lift and dynamic days lift to maximise this. Finally concentric failure (3) helps kick hypertrophy and structral changes into gear, here we seek our functional hypertrophy.

You’ll see many of the movements are simple compound exercises, these give best bang for buck performance return. Why the Russian conjugate system because I have found it works best out of all the modalities I’ve tried. Traceurs don’t have an on or off seasons and conjugate system reflects this. To keep progressing every 3-4 weeks all the exercises are changed for another from the list.

Exercises

Upper Core movements to choose from: Flat Bench Press (different grips to choose from), Dumbbell Bench, Weighted Dips, Weighted Pull ups, Floor Press, Shoulder Press.

Upper Supplementary Movements to choose from: Dumbbell Bench press incline/decline, dumbbell floor press, close grip bench press, weighted pull ups/chin ups, weighted press ups

Upper Assistance Work: Bent over flyes, Bend push downs, tricep extensions, scarecrows, bent over cable flyes, seated rows, lat pull down, pull-ups, bicep curls

Lower Core movements to choose from : Squat Variations, Deadlift Variations

Supplementary movement to choose from : Lunges (overhead, dumbbell, walking, reverse), Bulgarian split Squats, Step ups on to a box(with barbell or holding plate at arms length).

Assistance work to choose from : Glute Ham raise, Good mornings, pull throughs, Straight leg deadlifts, one legged deadlifts, Abdominal work.

So training days look a little something like this over 3 days a week :-

Max Effort Upper
1. Core movement (working up to a single set exercise for a max 3-5reps)
2. Supplementary movement, 1 exercise (3-4 sets 6-10 reps)
3. Assistance work (2-4 exercises for 3-4 sets and 8-12 reps)

Max Effort Lower
1. Core movement (working up to a single set for a max 3-5reps)
2. Supplementary movement, 1 exercise (3-4 sets 6-10 reps)
3. Assistance work (2-4 exercises for 3-4 sets and 8-12 reps)

Dynamic Effort Upper
1. Speed movement Bench Day: Bench 8 sets of 3 reps @ approximately 50- 60%
One rep max (1RM) *30-60s rest between sets (lifting as fast as possible)
2. Supplementary movement (same as max day)
3. Assistance work (same as max day)

You may notice two upper and one lower day, this is because the lower body takes such a beating from parkour activities that it would be determental to try train a dynamic lower body session.

Sample Training Day

Heres a sample program im using for a street performer/traceur. Obviously this may differ from what you may do.

MONDAY MAX EFFORT UPPER
1.CORE Weighted Dips working up to 3-5
2.SUPP Dumbbell bench press
3. ASIS Lat-pull down 3-4 sets 8-12 reps Bent over flyes 3-4 sets 8-12 reps

WEDNESDAY MAX EFFORT LOWER
1. CORE Tire flipping working up to 3-5
2. SUPP Steps ups on to a box holding sand bag
3. ASIS Good mornings 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps, Straight leg deadlift 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps, GHR if he has the energy.

Friday is Dynamic speed benching day. Sometimes We will throw in Speed muscle ups where he tries to do 5 or so muscle ups sometimes with weight as fast as he can for each concentric (lifting) movement. Every other day of the week he does parkour training alone. Except Sunday which he takes off, he does all this in the evening because he works through the day. When busy we will sometimes drop the dynamic day or if need be this day can be supplanted for the Parkour Gauntlet that Demon introduced to us. I wont be going into negatives and isometric training here because the article would turn into a thesis and ill leave it for a 2nd piece where we can add these advanced modalities in.

Conclusion

Be sure to check out The Traceur Diet for eating around your training. Without proper rest and nutrition you fall flat an make little progress. So make sure your working with maximum energy for parkour and for weight training. So I’ve given you an insight into how id train a traceur for parkour, there are methodologies I may use but most revolves around the conjugate training . The carry over to parkour will be huge and your other capacities will improve. Train hard so parkour becomes effortless.

Be sure to check out http://www.elitefts.com/documents/be...sc_program.htm
Benefits of Strength and Conditioning program by Detric Smith
__________________
"The overwhelming desire of society today is to assume that equal powers of reason are a universal heritage of humanity. It may well be. But simply wanting this to be the case is not enough. This is not science."
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http://williamwayland.blogspot.com/
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  #2  
Old 24-05-2007, 05:13 PM
benmoore benmoore is offline
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</div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (WillWayland @ May 24 2007, 01:51 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> Muscles For Traceurs

Muscles or Size is seen as dirty words in the parkour community, many are under the impression that any sort of muscular size on a traceur will kill their performance. This misconception is born of ignorance, media bias (muscles are out right now in fashion) and long standing myth. I have encountered this myth during my time as a martial artist. As I gained weight I was lectured by various instructors that being bigger would hamper my fighting ability. Some even went as far as to say it would slow me down (giving long winded physics lectures). In martial arts this comes from marketing gimmicks, the student puts faith in the instructor that what they are learning will help them against bigger stronger opponents. If that bigger stronger opponent happens to be skilled you are going to experience alot of pain. Bruce Lee also propagated the myth by being quoted as saying “Sure he’s big but can he use that muscle?” oh man now the lord god Bruce has said it surely he cant be wrong. He never says if it is good or bad he merely poses a question. This is my personal experience of the “size is bad” myth. I keep seeing it popping up in parkour forums all over.

In general bigger muscle is going to be a stronger muscle (you don’t see many weak big guys and no i dont mean fat people). While that's not always the case, it is part of the equation. It has to be useable mass or relative mass. You don't want to send somebody into a weight class heavier if they're just going to be weaker and have bigger muscles. Parkour does'nt have weight classes so this is a non issue but still it's just going to be counterproductive. So we have "non-functional hypertrophy" — an increase in muscle mass that's not accompanied by a performance improvement. Now generally this rare but It can happen, shortlimbed lifters sometimes get this. But too achieve this a long devotion to eatting and imbalanced training must be maintained. Dont let this be you in the gym.


The main difference in hypertrophy beneficial to parkour and bodybuilding hypertrophy is where the general concern is and what parameters are going to be used. The traceur will be more concerned with the mass he has around the elbow joint, the lower part of the triceps. He'll be concerned with the mass he can develop around the knee, the lower quad area. Also the stabilizing mass, the rotator cuff region, back thickness – things that are going to help him with his parkour. We want these size gains to come with a performance improvement.

So the traceur needs to increase their performance with different muscle actions (concentric, isometric and eccentric) Lifting, lowering and static holds. They need to work on high-threshold motor units or fast twitch fibers, explosive movements. With parkour any sprinting, jumping, sudden stops or change of direction where the athlete must absorb and stop the weight of his body, requires a lot of eccentric and isometric strength. So we are looking to improve the force a contracting muscle produces and encouraging the elastic component of the muscle to improve force production.

Bashing on Bodyweight

The point is this... bodyweight exercise only programs will only take you so far, and then some form of resistance training must be applied to see further improvement. You cannot achieve the same loading especially for movements like deadlifting and squating using bodyweight even with the addition of weight. Im not aginst bodyweight movements. Its just using only bodyweight limits your potential development because the load ultimatly stays the same, breaking a cardinal rule of resistance training that load must increase to make improvements. Im yet to see the body weight equivalent of snatch/clean and jerk/deadlift or any real pulling movements involving the legs.


i so should have put this as the title of this article

You Are Not Special

Sorry you’re not, the traceur is a human being and adheres to the same laws of physiology and biomechanics everyone else does, despite impressive feats the traceur doesn’t build super special muscles that can do things normal people can’t. In my work you have to see the human body as an organic machine that needs to be primed for optimal performance sure programs are specialized for the individual needs but the body adheres to the same simple laws. One other thing that needs to be addressed is the concept of “sport specific” training for athletes. The bottom line is this… there is no such thing as sport specific training! I repeat…there is no such thing as sport specific training! Loading movements is an even worse idea because it effects mechanics (ie punching while holding weights) and are about as much use as a smith machine. All athletes have similar needs which include improving strength, speed, and flexibility as well as preventing injury. When you think about it, most sports have the same requirements. You hear it in your training from parkour coaches also, many folks specialize too much too soon and end up injuring themselves without building up a decent skill/conditioning base, the same is true here.


no not some futuristic death sword, a weighted golf club infact
The Method

With my athletes I primarily use the Russian Conjugate System of Periodization (thanks to Joe Defranco and the Westside guys), simply put, entails training various motor qualities simultaneously (max strength, explosive, strength endurance). Contrasted to the Western model of Linear Periodization defines a procedure wherein different motor qualities are periodically trained in sequence, over time. The deficiency associated with the linear style of periodization is that as one progresses from one motor skill to the next, the skill which was developed in the previous period suffers a detraining effect.

The Max/Dynamic Effort methodology was defined by Vladimir Zatsiorsky, a world renowned strength scientist and author, who determined that there are three distinct methods for developing maximal tension within skeletal muscle fibers. These are:

1. Lifting weights at high to maximal (max) percentages of one’s one rep max (i.e. Max Effort-strength speed).

2. Lifting sub-maximal weights explosively (i.e. Dynamic Effort-speed strength).

3. Lifting sub-maximal weights to concentric muscle failure (i.e. Repetition Method-strength endurance/lactic acid tolerance training-assistance/supplementary exercises).

The conjugate method takes all 3 of these and throws them together into daily programs.

So we take a Max effort lift (1) for each training session and shoot for 3-5 reps working up from a warm up. So progression may go on bench press for example 60 x 8, 100 x 6, 115 x 6, 125 x 6, 130 x 3-5. Max effort lifts can be anything. Sometimes I use pull-ups and other pulling variations, Farmer’s walks, tire flips or even regular, old-fashioned squats. Dynamics movements (2) revolve around taking a submaximal load and moving it as fast as possible, we have the supplementary lift and dynamic days lift to maximise this. Finally concentric failure (3) helps kick hypertrophy and structral changes into gear, here we seek our functional hypertrophy.

You’ll see many of the movements are simple compound exercises, these give best bang for buck performance return. Why the Russian conjugate system because I have found it works best out of all the modalities I’ve tried. Traceurs don’t have an on or off seasons and conjugate system reflects this. To keep progressing every 3-4 weeks all the exercises are changed for another from the list.

Exercises

Upper Core movements to choose from: Flat Bench Press (different grips to choose from), Dumbbell Bench, Weighted Dips, Weighted Pull ups, Floor Press, Shoulder Press.

Upper Supplementary Movements to choose from: Dumbbell Bench press incline/decline, dumbbell floor press, close grip bench press, weighted pull ups/chin ups, weighted press ups

Upper Assistance Work: Bent over flyes, Bend push downs, tricep extensions, scarecrows, bent over cable flyes, seated rows, lat pull down, pull-ups, bicep curls

Lower Core movements to choose from : Squat Variations, Deadlift Variations

Supplementary movement to choose from : Lunges (overhead, dumbbell, walking, reverse), Bulgarian split Squats, Step ups on to a box(with barbell or holding plate at arms length).

Assistance work to choose from : Glute Ham raise, Good mornings, pull throughs, Straight leg deadlifts, one legged deadlifts, Abdominal work.

So training days look a little something like this over 3 days a week :-

Max Effort Upper
1. Core movement (working up to a single set exercise for a max 3-5reps)
2. Supplementary movement, 1 exercise (3-4 sets 6-10 reps)
3. Assistance work (2-4 exercises for 3-4 sets and 8-12 reps)

Max Effort Lower
1. Core movement (working up to a single set for a max 3-5reps)
2. Supplementary movement, 1 exercise (3-4 sets 6-10 reps)
3. Assistance work (2-4 exercises for 3-4 sets and 8-12 reps)

Dynamic Effort Upper
1. Speed movement Bench Day: Bench 8 sets of 3 reps @ approximately 50- 60%
One rep max (1RM) *30-60s rest between sets (lifting as fast as possible)
2. Supplementary movement (same as max day)
3. Assistance work (same as max day)

You may notice two upper and one lower day, this is because the lower body takes such a beating from parkour activities that it would be determental to try train a dynamic lower body session.

Sample Training Day

Heres a sample program im using for a street performer/traceur. Obviously this may differ from what you may do.

MONDAY MAX EFFORT UPPER
1.CORE Weighted Dips working up to 3-5
2.SUPP Dumbbell bench press
3. ASIS Lat-pull down 3-4 sets 8-12 reps Bent over flyes 3-4 sets 8-12 reps

WEDNESDAY MAX EFFORT LOWER
1. CORE Tire flipping working up to 3-5
2. SUPP Steps ups on to a box holding sand bag
3. ASIS Good mornings 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps, Straight leg deadlift 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps, GHR if he has the energy.

Friday is Dynamic speed benching day. Sometimes We will throw in Speed muscle ups where he tries to do 5 or so muscle ups sometimes with weight as fast as he can for each concentric (lifting) movement. Every other day of the week he does parkour training alone. Except Sunday which he takes off, he does all this in the evening because he works through the day. When busy we will sometimes drop the dynamic day or if need be this day can be supplanted for the Parkour Gauntlet that Demon introduced to us. I wont be going into negatives and isometric training here because the article would turn into a thesis and ill leave it for a 2nd piece where we can add these advanced modalities in.

Conclusion

Be sure to check out The Traceur Diet for eating around your training. Without proper rest and nutrition you fall flat an make little progress. So make sure your working with maximum energy for parkour and for weight training. So I’ve given you an insight into how id train a traceur for parkour, there are methodologies I may use but most revolves around the conjugate training . The carry over to parkour will be huge and your other capacities will improve. Train hard so parkour becomes effortless.

Be sure to check out http://www.elitefts.com/documents/be...sc_program.htm
Benefits of Strength and Conditioning program by Detric Smith [/quote]
OH LAWDY!

This is one heck of an article William, you didnt tell me you were cooking this one up!

Haha love the style/layout - very t-nation :lol:

<span style='color:red'><span style='font-size:21pt;line-height:100%'><span style='font-family:Arial'>[DEMAND] MOD STICKY PLEASE! [/DEMAND]</span></span></span>
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  #3  
Old 24-05-2007, 05:28 PM
Supafly Supafly is offline
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.....................Whoa!



+1....
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  #4  
Old 24-05-2007, 06:31 PM
Mitch Mitch is offline
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Ben why the hell do you have to quote the whole article... pretty silly TBH

Awesome article
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  #5  
Old 24-05-2007, 06:34 PM
benmoore benmoore is offline
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</div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Mitch @ May 24 2007, 06:31 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> Ben why the hell do you have to quote the whole article... pretty silly TBH

Awesome article [/quote]
Because its sheer awesomeness demanded being repeated?

Nah I just hit the quote button automatically.

In any case its not that much of problem - just scroll down a little bit.

You should be thanking me for the extra exercise B)

Anyways ON TOPIC.
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  #6  
Old 24-05-2007, 08:23 PM
jin jin is offline
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That was a good read, i liked it. Just got a couple of questions. Was the part about bodyweight referring to whole body movements with movements like deadlifts, or general bodyweight training because i cant imagine getting to a point where i can bust out one arm handstand pushups or one arm PULLups easily!
Also, what do you think about things like weighted drills such as presicions with 10kg repeated hundred or so times, or practicing drops from knee heights hundreds of times to build up slowly to higher drops, both of which are part of my training.
cheers,
j
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  #7  
Old 24-05-2007, 09:44 PM
WillWayland WillWayland is offline
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</div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (jin @ May 24 2007, 08:23 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> That was a good read, i liked it. Just got a couple of questions. Was the part about bodyweight referring to whole body movements with movements like deadlifts, or general bodyweight training because i cant imagine getting to a point where i can bust out one arm handstand pushups or one arm PULLups easily!
Also, what do you think about things like weighted drills such as presicions with 10kg repeated hundred or so times, or practicing drops from knee heights hundreds of times to build up slowly to higher drops, both of which are part of my training.
cheers,
j [/quote]
General bodyweight movements was what i was refering to. Problem is with bodyweight movements is pulling from the floor is very hard to replicate the same stimulus. With handstand push ups we cant get the same ROM we could using a barbell. Free weights enable us to make minor adjustments in load that we can do with a weighted vest or dip belt and use a greater variety of loading parameters.

Weighted drills would be a bad idea, because it effects motor skills and movement patterns used during parkour movement. The weight depending where it is loaded could move your center of gravity and make drilling more dangerous.

Drops downs and the like would be considered part of your parkour training and not part of strength and condtioning work. Running with a weighted vest could be considered part of general physical preparedness for parkour.
__________________
"The overwhelming desire of society today is to assume that equal powers of reason are a universal heritage of humanity. It may well be. But simply wanting this to be the case is not enough. This is not science."
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http://williamwayland.blogspot.com/
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  #8  
Old 24-05-2007, 11:14 PM
donjman donjman is offline
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Really nice article, really t-nation feel to it like ben said.

Awesome, let this be stickied please.

Thanks again Will.
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  #9  
Old 25-05-2007, 12:40 AM
Supafly Supafly is offline
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Quote:
Muscles or Size is seen as dirty words in tha parkour communizzles mizzle is rappa tha impression tizzle any siznort of muscular size on a traceur wizzy kill they performance so you betta run and grab yo glock. This misconcizzles is born of ignorance, media bias (muscles is out right now in fashion) n long pimpin' mizzyth. I have encountered this M-to-tha-izzyth dur'n mah tizzy as a martial artist . Aint no L-I-M-I-to-tha-T. As I gained weight I was lectured by various instructors T-H-to-tha-izzat being bigga would gangsta mah clockin' ability. Some even wizzy as far as ta say it would slow me down Mobbin' long winded physics lectures). In martial arts this comes fizzle pimpin' gimmicks, tha student puts faith in tha instructor that wizzy they is learn'n wizzay hizzy them against bigga gangsta opponents. If tizzy bigga hustla opponent happens ta be skilled you is going ta experience alot of pain. Bruce Lee also propagated tha M-to-tha-izzyth by being quoted as say'n �Sure he�s big but can he use thizzay muscle?� oh dawg now tha lord god Bruce has said it surely he cant be wrong. He motherfucka sez if it is good or bad he merely poses a question. This is mah personal experience of tha �size is bizzle mizzle so show some love niggaz. I keep messin' it popp'n up in parkour forums all brotha.

Sorry to come off topic, but the first sentence is HILARIOUS!
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  #10  
Old 25-05-2007, 07:32 AM
benmoore benmoore is offline
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</div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (WillWayland @ May 24 2007, 09:44 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> </div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (jin @ May 24 2007, 08:23 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> That was a good read, i liked it.* Just got a couple of questions.* Was the part about bodyweight referring to whole body movements with movements like deadlifts, or general bodyweight training because i cant imagine getting to a point where i can bust out one arm handstand pushups or one arm PULLups easily!
Also, what do you think about things like weighted drills such as presicions with 10kg repeated hundred or so times, or practicing drops from knee heights hundreds of times to build up slowly to higher drops, both of which are part of my training.
cheers,
j [/quote]
General bodyweight movements was what i was refering to. Problem is with bodyweight movements is pulling from the floor is very hard to replicate the same stimulus. With handstand push ups we cant get the same ROM we could using a barbell. Free weights enable us to make minor adjustments in load that we can do with a weighted vest or dip belt and use a greater variety of loading parameters.

Weighted drills would be a bad idea, because it effects motor skills and movement patterns used during parkour movement. The weight depending where it is loaded could move your center of gravity and make drilling more dangerous.

Drops downs and the like would be considered part of your parkour training and not part of strength and condtioning work. Running with a weighted vest could be considered part of general physical preparedness for parkour. [/quote]
Not a major point but handstand pushups can be performed with hands on books/boxes/paralell bars etc. which allow for full ROM; taking ROM out of the equation as the limiting factor for this exercise. Only major limitation would be the relatively unchanging load.
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